Dyna-Glo Verses Mr. Heater Portable Propane Heaters

Our Recent Experience with Portable Propane Heaters

Whether you live in a city or remotely, there is often a time where a reliable space heater comes in handy, – arguably, when its cold enough and your main heat source is not enough or not working, it becomes a device that can make an unpleasant day bearable. When you live in the wilderness and a long way from a hardware or department store, it is a good idea to have a space heater before you need one, because when you live remote, your options are more limited and supply is often exhausted when a storm approaches, – not to mention, if you live as far out as we do, you have dirt roads that easily become impassable or at least unpleasant during snow and rain storms.

Due to some recent experiences with new space heaters, I thought our experiences with two brands may be worth examining. We had a Mr. Heater Big Buddy that we bought last February (2018), mostly on a whim due to a clearance sale at our local Wal-Mart,  we used it a few times and found it a little finicky, sometimes difficult to start, but generally pretty reliable. It being so late in the season, we didn’t have much time to evaluate it last year.

This season, which began in late October 2018, we promptly learned that what began as fussiness and a tendency to be difficult to light became a tedious challenge to light and keep it lit. I am not sure what the problem was, but I tend to think it was the carbon monoxide safety switch or valve, perhaps set too sensitive. After a month long series of exchanges with Mr. Heater customer service, who were always pleasant enough (if you could get them on the phone), we sent our “Big Buddy” back and once it arrived at their address, they promptly sent a replacement. The current replacement works flawlessly for the last two months, very reliable and pretty darn handy with our rather harsh winter this year. So far we have zero complaints with the replacement (same model).

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Sheep Manure in the Garden

At various times the subject of garden fertilization using sheep manure comes our way; naturally, we are great advocates of the practice! Using sheep manure has many advantages over other alternatives and a relative few disadvantages. Perhaps the most beneficial aspect of sheep manure is its compact and clean nature; it is easily the cleanest, least revolting “natural” manure available. Not only do sheep shed their nasty smelling sulfides in the production of wool, it comes in a clean utilitarian form, quick-drying compact pellets that are easy to dry, transport and utilize in the garden.

If that isn’t enough, sheep manure generally doesn’t need much aging or special preparation; it comes ready-made for application. Generally, sheep manure takes about a week or two to thoroughly dry in Arizona’s sunny and arid environment. Properly raised sheep, meaning largely pen fed with alfalfa as ours are, which have no exposure to other animals or toxic chemicals (fertilizers, tainted water or medications) do not even require drying, though we do in all cases dry our manure for two weeks because of the need to store large quantities and for shipping purposes. Manure will mold if it is not thoroughly dried, – if properly dried manure will store for many months, but great care needs to be taken to monitor inventory. Even a small introduction of “moist” manure can contaminate the driest manure, ruining an entire batch.

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Good and Bad Batteries

Good and Bad Batteries

One of the most difficult decisions a family of limited means has to face when dealing with batteries is the decision to reduce a battery bank. When batteries begin to fail it forces owners to make difficult decisions, namely to cut out the bad batteries from the battery bank (and reducing bank capacity) or buying new batteries. While it is natural to resist taking the decision to remove bad batteries, it is vital that you do this earlier rather than later, the longer you keep even one bad battery in a battery bank, the more the harm will spread, – bad batteries make weak batteries worse and eventually you find yourself with several bad batteries and a next to worthless system.

Obviously in an ideal situation you buy new batteries, even fewer new batteries are better than a larger battery bank of weak batteries, but resist the urge to just replace one or two batteries with new batteries, as while this is an option the new batteries will have shorter lives and in the long run is generally counter-productive. The weaker batteries will “lean” on the new batteries and it will shorten the useful life of the good batteries.

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Nicks and Cuts

While the topic of accidental injuries is often mentioned, very little seems to be offered on how to minimize the occurrence. First off I should say that the occasional nick or cut is almost unavoidable, though it is almost always the shearer’s fault and usually due to a lack of control of the animal, the machine or blade position. Often times other factors like exhaustion, frustration or dull blades can play a role. One needs to remember the animal is scared and often exhausted itself and losing your temper can only contribute to a greater likelihood of more nicks and cuts, so attention should be given to your state of mind and the animal’s behavior.

The areas most prone to a problem are areas where wrinkles and creases or folds occur, this includes the neck, the area under and around the elbow, the tail and the softer underbelly where the skin is thin and the nipples are (you want to keep the full comb flat against skin, not go up narrow folds). None of these are especially troublesome if everything is going well and the animal is calm and well controlled, but things the shearer do can contribute to problems, – pulling or twisting the skin creating a fold or crease will allow skin into the space between the comb’s teeth. Abrasions and nicks are common and utterly unavoidable, even on flat areas where you have good control and keeping the skin flat, but cuts and serious abrasions can be minimized if enough patience is exhibited.

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