Manure Use and Storage

With summer just around the corner, we have been inundated with orders for manure, with just a month into our busy season we have exhausted a significant amount of our processed inventory accumulated over the winter. Currently we are working through the bulk manure we have only roughly sorted and are focusing on collection and drying new inventory.

While working through this process the mind wanders and it occurred to me to that we should do a blog post on how customers can properly store manure to last beyond immediate use, for this is not always as obvious as it seems… the process of collection and sorting is always changing, over the last decade we have changed how we collect, sort and process manure many times, primarily trying to find the finished product that would offer the most appeal with the least work. Perhaps the most problematic step in the process is the drying and storing, we are blessed with ideal weather and climate for this process, perhaps no better place in the United States exists. We have extremely low humidity, vast amounts of sun, and short rainy seasons. These factors make this type of product practical here, for someone in a more humid environment the drying and storage would be far more problematic.

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Manure and Its Uses

Manure sales are a critical aspect of our year round income, while wool sells during winter with some consistency; it is at most a supplemental source of income. The other large source of income is selling rams and lambs, while this is often our largest sales for the year; they are generally one off events and nothing that can be relied upon.  Typically lamb sales are once or twice a year, unless a stray buyer or trade comes along.

It is manure sales that offer a relatively consistent sales record; typically it sells year round, though perhaps more during the easing of winter and through the spring. For this reason it is something we spend a great deal of time modifying our methods and product line. Recently we introduced the selling of manure directly through this website, this is primarily because the on-line retail sites are expensive (fees), arrogant and arbitrary in dealing with sellers. Their policies and fees directly increase the costs we must charge, which hampers sales (higher price point), it also increases our expenses which harm our animals. Typically when we have good sales of wool and manure, or sell off lambs, the surplus is largely used to purchase more and better feed, improve structures, and provide the ewes with special treats, like carrots and grains.

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Lambs

Just as the death of a cherished ewe causes sorrow, the birth of new lambs are the bright spot of the year. Generally, for the breed of sheep we raise, this occurs primarily in February and March, which is generally when the weather starts to improve. This lambing season has begun well for us, so far three ewe lambs and only one ram lamb. More importantly, the mother ewes have been among our strongest and youngest animals, which give the lambs the best shot of a problem freelambhood”. This is also of tremendous value for the shepherd as it relieves the necessity of close monitoring and hand feeding, which often accompanies the birth of a lamb to an older ewe.

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Marley

Rarely does the death of a sheep cause more than distraction during the day, sadness for the lost life, but mostly due to the loss of a productive animal and a nuisance having to bury the animal. We generally place a higher value to the life and well being of our ewes, they are not only our greatest resource, lambs, but they are generally tamer and friendlier, less of a burden to maintain and care for. Over the years that we have raised sheep, there have been a few that have stood out, while I am very familiar with all of them, knowing their personalities and habits, a few have found a special place within the herd. One such animal was a ewe that we have owned for over 11 years, a very productive animal, and mother of several other productive ewes. She came to us early in our ranching, one of four ewes we bought from a couple outside of Flagstaff. She was a spooky little lady for the first few years, but shortly after we started to shear our own sheep she came to be a little more trusting, knowing that we didn’t have any desire to harm her. We think it is important that you shear your own animals if at all possible, while they do not like it, it does help building trust between and animal and a shepard. If you hire out the work it is far more difficult to develop a relationship with an animal. Simply put, sheep are not stupid, they are often incredibly intelligent, – I have found them more intelligent than many people I deal with… while they are suspicious of any human presence, the more contact you have with them lessens the fear they have, at least if you are deliberate in your dealings with them. One stupid act can undo a week of kindness, but over time, once trust is created, they can be very tame and friendly. At least it is possible with most ewes, – some are impossible to reach and this is surely because of past mistakes in your behavior as a shepard (sheep do not forget or forgive easily).

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